Meet a garden regular: Blue Tit

NB_Covers_BTO-1.jpg

This article comes from the BTO’s Nestboxes: Your Complete Guide. Learn more.

© British Trust for Ornithology. Used with permission.

The quirky and the interesting... 
21 Facts about Blue Tits >

nb_smallhole.png

Prefers nestboxes with small entrance holes.

Birds may be reluctant to approach a box if people are standing right next to it. If you know that the birds are feeding chicks, particularly if these are about a week old when the feeding rate is at its highest, try to avoid spending long periods of time standing near the box. Short visits made to the nest to monitor breeding attempts do not impact on breeding success.

Blue Tit

Cyanistes caeruleus

Blue tits occupy many varied nest sites. Apart from nestboxes,

they will use holes in pipes, lamp standards (street lights) and post boxes.

 

Gardens in most parts of the UK will be visited daily by Blue Tits looking for food. In spring Blue Tits will also be looking for potential nest site cavities in trees or old walls but they will readily take to garden nestboxes, too.

 

A nest with a view

Do not hide the box behind garden plants; Blue Tits like to be able to scan for predators when leaving a box, so like an unobstructed view. Avoid obvious sun-traps, such as south-facing walls, to stop chicks overheating. Cold winds and damp conditions can also cause problems for chicks, so avoid putting boxes in the shady wind tunnels between houses. 

Frustrate domestic cats, which can cause havoc to nesting birds, by placing your nestbox away from any wall-tops or tree branches that would make access easier. Remove any perches from your nestbox to ensure predators cannot get an easy foothold.

Choose a quiet spot

 

Parent Blue Tits typically provide nestlings with up to 1,000 food items each day, ideally caterpillars but other insects and spiders may also feature.

National Nestbox Week is an established part of the ornithological calendar. Celebrated from February 14th each year, it puts the spotlight on breeding birds and asks everyone to put up more nestboxes in their local area. National Nestbox Week was first established in 1997 by the BTO and Britain’s leading birdcare specialist Jacobi Jayne & Co.

Nestbox Week 2019 Logo

Nestboxes come in many shapes to suit different birds.

Click on each box to learn a little more.

nb_smallhole.png
nb_largebirds.png
nb_larger.png
nb_openfront.png
wren.png
avianex.png
Asset 20.png

If you would like

high-resolution Nestbox Week logos please contact us